Hiking New Hampshire’s 4,000 Footers with Children

By Wanderschool on 30 June 2019

The following content comes from Wanderschool.  Click here to view the original content in full.

Julie, homeschooling mother of 4 children, writes about her experience hiking a couple of New Hampshire's 4,000 foot peaks.

I certainly believe that many things are possible with children. This adventure may certainly be one of them, provided you do some independent research on the peaks before you set out so you know what you are getting yourself and group into, including ensuring that you are prepared, know the weather, have some prior hiking with kids (or outside) experience, are adequately packed with the right gear, have a map and know how to use it, and have a backup/change of plan strategy.

To read her full story of tackling two of the forty-eight 4,000 foot peaks, follow the link above.

About the Author

Wanderschool

We’re a wandering homeschool family.  Although we have a fixed address, we spend much of our time traveling and on the road. Perhaps it’s wanderlust that leads us to our adventures.  Perhaps it’s our desire to educate our children wholistically, in a way that reminds them that everything and everyone is connected, that compels us to wander. Maybe it’s just that we see travel as an opportunity for our children to become truly self-reliant, culturally aware, worldly learners and thinkers who might just contribute a bit of goodness to others and the world after they’ve left our nest. We appreciate how travel naturally reminds our children that they are ultimately in charge of their own education, that learning opportunities are endless, and that there are intrinsic rewards to stepping beyond the comfort zone.

“Children learn what they live. Put kids in a class and they will live out their lives in an invisible cage, isolated from their chance at community; interrupt kids with bells and horns all the time and they will learn that nothing is important or worth finishing; ridicule them and they will retreat from human association; shame them and they will find a hundred ways to get even. The habits taught in large-scale organizations are deadly.” – John Taylor Gatto, author of Dumbing Us Down

The world is our classroom.   We have chosen to educate our children outside of the invisible cage of a school classroom.  After all, children do learn what they live.  Learning isn’t seasonal in our family.  It doesn’t stop at 180 school calendar days or after snow days are made up sometime in June.  Learning takes place everyday, 365 days a year.  At any given hour, on any particular day, of any particular month you might just happen to find us on one of our wander school adventures. We look forward to having you wander with us.

View More of their Work | Visit Their Website | @wanderschooling

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